X
Register/Log in
SEARCH THE SITE
Shop by Category
Shrubs Trees Vines & Climbers Houseplants Supplies Gift Certificate
THE SCOOP
Planting Guides Events & Airtimes About Us Subscribe Guarantee/Warranty My Account Site Map Privacy Policy Contact Us View Wheelbarrow
Register/Log in
X
Annuals
View All Sun Shade
MORE TO EXPLORE
Planting Guides Zone Map The Scoop
X
Perennials
View All Sun Shade
MORE TO EXPLORE
Planting Guides Zone Map The Scoop
X
Edibles
View All Fruit Vegetables
MORE TO EXPLORE
Planting Guides Zone Map The Scoop
X
Roses
View All Climbing Roses Miniature Roses
MORE TO EXPLORE
Planting Guides Zone Map The Scoop

Anything that can hold soil and provide drainage can become a planter. From modern rectangular pots to rustic metal washtubs to romantic Victorian urns, the possibilities are endless. You can easily create themes and color combinations that suit your taste and complement your home.
• Start with a container with adequate drainage. If the container doesn’t seem to have enough drainage holes for water to flow through the soil, add a few more by drilling, carving or punching holes in the bottom of the container.
• If you are reusing a container from the previous year, clean it thoroughly to remove salt build-up and eliminate any pest or disease that may be lingering on the surface. Salt build-up appears as a white, crusty substance on the bottom or edges of pots. It comes from the minerals in soil, tap water and fertilizers.
• Take note of the amount of sunlight the area you’ll be placing the container receives. This will help you determine the types of plants to choose. Do you need sun lovers or shade lovers? Full sun plants need at least 6 hours of sun each day. Partial sun plants need 4-6 hours of sun per day and shade plants grow best with less than 4 hours of sun per day (preferably morning or evening sun).
• A common design theme for containers is the combination of thriller/filler/spiller. The thriller is placed in the middle or back of the planter as a tall focal point (Cherry Blossom Sedge, Fireworks Fountain Grass). The filler (SunPatiens®, Petunia Sweetunia®) are plants that surround and highlight the thriller. The spiller plants (Tidal Wave Petunia™, Lobularia, and EnduraScape™ Verbena) trail over the edges of the pot to finish the dramatic effect.
• Determine how many plants you will need. Typically, 3-4 starter plants will fill a 10-12" container and 5-8 starter plants will fill a 16-20" pot. You can crowd your planter if you need a full look for an upcoming event, but be prepared to replace the plants when they start to deteriorate. Otherwise, give the plants plenty of room for growth and air circulation.
• Choose plants that require the same conditions. Plant sun lovers with sun lovers and shade lovers with shade lovers. Plants that need to dry out in-between watering (succulents) would not pair well with plants that only perform when kept evenly moist (Alocasia).
• Buy a good quality potting mix that will absorb water and hold moisture evenly. Potting mixes that contain organic matter and materials such as perlite and vermiculite are best. Don’t be tempted to buy topsoil or scoop up soil from the garden. Plants in containers perform best in a balanced potting mix. If the potting mix does not contain fertilizer, be prepared to fertilize on a regular basis during the season.
• Modern tall urns and planters have become popular focal points for entryways. They do not have to be filled all the way to the bottom with soil. There are a number of ways to fill a portion of the container and save money on potting mix. Use large chunks of packing Styrofoam, turn an empty pot upside down in the bottom of the container or add large rocks if you don’t mind the extra weight. Avoid adding materials like newspaper or cardboard that could break down and compromise the quality of your potting mix.
• Coco liners and moss-lined pots are very popular hanging basket planters. They can be lined with landscape fabric before planting to prevent water and soil from running out of the porous material.
• Houseplants can be incorporated into container displays for a nice grouping during the summer months. Houseplants like Desert Rose, Gardenias, Chlorophytum Ribbon Plant and Ponytail Palm love to spend the summer outdoors. Remember to acclimate them to their new environment by exposing them to outdoor temperatures and sun little by little to avoid leaf scorch.
Quick steps to planting containers
1. Choose a container with adequate drainage.
2. Fill the container with potting mix, leaving about 2 inches in large pots and approximately ½ inch in small pots. Work any time-released granular fertilizer into the soil if desired.
3. Gently wet the top of the soil to allow it to settle.
4. Follow the thriller/filler/spiller concept described in the tips above. Add your thriller plants to the center or back of the container. Next, place the filler plants in front of or surrounding the thriller plant. Finally, add the spiller plants that will trail over the edge of the planter.
5. Water thoroughly. It may be necessary to add additional potting mix if the soil has settled too low in the pot. Repeat watering in any additional soil.
There are a few things to note for hanging basket containers
Watering is the biggest challenge when it comes to hanging basket care. Hanging baskets tend to dry out faster than other container plantings. Large hanging baskets are easier to maintain as a higher volume of soil will stay moist longer than a small one. A majority of hanging baskets on the market are made from plastic. Plastic containers are usually inexpensive and tend to hold moisture well. Although plastic may not be the most attractive material, a spiller plant cascading down the sides of the pot will cover the plastic and create a delightful display. Coco liner or moss-lined hanging baskets are quite attractive, but watering can be a problem. They are so porous that water runs through too fast without saturating the soil. Some come with a plastic lining which can be helpful for retaining moisture. Ones that do not include a plastic liner can be remedied quickly by adding some landscape fabric. Because landscape fabric is permeable, it allows water to flow through while keeping the soil in place. When choosing plants for your hanging basket, it is wise to choose drought and heat tolerant plants, especially for baskets in full sun. Regardless of sun exposure, always to choose plants well-suited to your environment. By choosing the right plants, you can spend more time enjoying their beauty and less time tending to them.
Additional tips to keep your containers looking nice over the growing season
• As your planter continues to fill in and grow, apply a water-soluble fertilizer once every week or two.
• Be careful to not over-water plants in plastic or glazed-finish pots. These types of pots hold moisture longer than traditional clay pots. During the heat of summer, over-watering is rarely a problem.
• If one of your plants starts to take over the container, feel free to trim it back to give the other plants the room they need. It’s also okay to trim plants back if they start to look poor. Sometimes this is just what they need to be rejuvenated.
Anything that can hold soil and provide drainage can become a planter. From modern rectangular pots to rustic metal washtubs to romantic Victorian urns, the possibilities are endless. You can easily create themes and color combinations that suit your taste and complement your home.
• Start with a container with adequate drainage. If the container doesn’t seem to have enough drainage holes for water to flow through the soil, add a few more by drilling, carving or punching holes in the bottom of the container.
• If you are reusing a container from the previous year, clean it thoroughly to remove salt build-up and eliminate any pest or disease that may be lingering on the surface. Salt build-up appears as a white, crusty substance on the bottom or edges of pots. It comes from the minerals in soil, tap water and fertilizers.
• Take note of the amount of sunlight the area you’ll be placing the container receives. This will help you determine the types of plants to choose. Do you need sun lovers or shade lovers? Full sun plants need at least 6 hours of sun each day. Partial sun plants need 4-6 hours of sun per day and shade plants grow best with less than 4 hours of sun per day (preferably morning or evening sun).
• A common design theme for containers is the combination of thriller/filler/spiller. The thriller is placed in the middle or back of the planter as a tall focal point (Cherry Blossom Sedge, Fireworks Fountain Grass). The filler (SunPatiens®, Petunia Sweetunia®) are plants that surround and highlight the thriller. The spiller plants (Tidal Wave Petunia™, Lobularia, and EnduraScape™ Verbena) trail over the edges of the pot to finish the dramatic effect.
• Determine how many plants you will need. Typically, 3-4 starter plants will fill a 10-12" container and 5-8 starter plants will fill a 16-20" pot. You can crowd your planter if you need a full look for an upcoming event, but be prepared to replace the plants when they start to deteriorate. Otherwise, give the plants plenty of room for growth and air circulation.
• Choose plants that require the same conditions. Plant sun lovers with sun lovers and shade lovers with shade lovers. Plants that need to dry out in-between watering (succulents) would not pair well with plants that only perform when kept evenly moist (Alocasia).
• Buy a good quality potting mix that will absorb water and hold moisture evenly. Potting mixes that contain organic matter and materials such as perlite and vermiculite are best. Don’t be tempted to buy topsoil or scoop up soil from the garden. Plants in containers perform best in a balanced potting mix. If the potting mix does not contain fertilizer, be prepared to fertilize on a regular basis during the season.
• Modern tall urns and planters have become popular focal points for entryways. They do not have to be filled all the way to the bottom with soil. There are a number of ways to fill a portion of the container and save money on potting mix. Use large chunks of packing Styrofoam, turn an empty pot upside down in the bottom of the container or add large rocks if you don’t mind the extra weight. Avoid adding materials like newspaper or cardboard that could break down and compromise the quality of your potting mix.
• Coco liners and moss-lined pots are very popular hanging basket planters. They can be lined with landscape fabric before planting to prevent water and soil from running out of the porous material.
• Houseplants can be incorporated into container displays for a nice grouping during the summer months. Houseplants like Desert Rose, Gardenias, Chlorophytum Ribbon Plant and Ponytail Palm love to spend the summer outdoors. Remember to acclimate them to their new environment by exposing them to outdoor temperatures and sun little by little to avoid leaf scorch.
Quick steps to planting containers
1. Choose a container with adequate drainage.
2. Fill the container with potting mix, leaving about 2 inches in large pots and approximately ½ inch in small pots. Work any time-released granular fertilizer into the soil if desired.
3. Gently wet the top of the soil to allow it to settle.
4. Follow the thriller/filler/spiller concept described in the tips above. Add your thriller plants to the center or back of the container. Next, place the filler plants in front of or surrounding the thriller plant. Finally, add the spiller plants that will trail over the edge of the planter.
5. Water thoroughly. It may be necessary to add additional potting mix if the soil has settled too low in the pot. Repeat watering in any additional soil.
There are a few things to note for hanging basket containers
Watering is the biggest challenge when it comes to hanging basket care. Hanging baskets tend to dry out faster than other container plantings. Large hanging baskets are easier to maintain as a higher volume of soil will stay moist longer than a small one. A majority of hanging baskets on the market are made from plastic. Plastic containers are usually inexpensive and tend to hold moisture well. Although plastic may not be the most attractive material, a spiller plant cascading down the sides of the pot will cover the plastic and create a delightful display. Coco liner or moss-lined hanging baskets are quite attractive, but watering can be a problem. They are so porous that water runs through too fast without saturating the soil. Some come with a plastic lining which can be helpful for retaining moisture. Ones that do not include a plastic liner can be remedied quickly by adding some landscape fabric. Because landscape fabric is permeable, it allows water to flow through while keeping the soil in place. When choosing plants for your hanging basket, it is wise to choose drought and heat tolerant plants, especially for baskets in full sun. Regardless of sun exposure, always to choose plants well-suited to your environment. By choosing the right plants, you can spend more time enjoying their beauty and less time tending to them.
Additional tips to keep your containers looking nice over the growing season
• As your planter continues to fill in and grow, apply a water-soluble fertilizer once every week or two.
• Be careful to not over-water plants in plastic or glazed-finish pots. These types of pots hold moisture longer than traditional clay pots. During the heat of summer, over-watering is rarely a problem.
• If one of your plants starts to take over the container, feel free to trim it back to give the other plants the room they need. It’s also okay to trim plants back if they start to look poor. Sometimes this is just what they need to be rejuvenated.
Anything that can hold soil and provide drainage can become a planter. From modern rectangular pots to rustic metal washtubs to romantic Victorian urns, the possibilities are endless. You can easily create themes and color combinations that suit your taste and complement your home.
• Start with a container with adequate drainage. If the container doesn’t seem to have enough drainage holes for water to flow through the soil, add a few more by drilling, carving or punching holes in the bottom of the container.
• If you are reusing a container from the previous year, clean it thoroughly to remove salt build-up and eliminate any pest or disease that may be lingering on the surface. Salt build-up appears as a white, crusty substance on the bottom or edges of pots. It comes from the minerals in soil, tap water and fertilizers.
• Take note of the amount of sunlight the area you’ll be placing the container receives. This will help you determine the types of plants to choose. Do you need sun lovers or shade lovers? Full sun plants need at least 6 hours of sun each day. Partial sun plants need 4-6 hours of sun per day and shade plants grow best with less than 4 hours of sun per day (preferably morning or evening sun).
• A common design theme for containers is the combination of thriller/filler/spiller. The thriller is placed in the middle or back of the planter as a tall focal point (Cherry Blossom Sedge, Fireworks Fountain Grass). The filler (SunPatiens®, Petunia Sweetunia®) are plants that surround and highlight the thriller. The spiller plants (Tidal Wave Petunia™, Lobularia, and EnduraScape™ Verbena) trail over the edges of the pot to finish the dramatic effect.
• Determine how many plants you will need. Typically, 3-4 starter plants will fill a 10-12" container and 5-8 starter plants will fill a 16-20" pot. You can crowd your planter if you need a full look for an upcoming event, but be prepared to replace the plants when they start to deteriorate. Otherwise, give the plants plenty of room for growth and air circulation.
• Choose plants that require the same conditions. Plant sun lovers with sun lovers and shade lovers with shade lovers. Plants that need to dry out in-between watering (succulents) would not pair well with plants that only perform when kept evenly moist (Alocasia).
• Buy a good quality potting mix that will absorb water and hold moisture evenly. Potting mixes that contain organic matter and materials such as perlite and vermiculite are best. Don’t be tempted to buy topsoil or scoop up soil from the garden. Plants in containers perform best in a balanced potting mix. If the potting mix does not contain fertilizer, be prepared to fertilize on a regular basis during the season.
• Modern tall urns and planters have become popular focal points for entryways. They do not have to be filled all the way to the bottom with soil. There are a number of ways to fill a portion of the container and save money on potting mix. Use large chunks of packing Styrofoam, turn an empty pot upside down in the bottom of the container or add large rocks if you don’t mind the extra weight. Avoid adding materials like newspaper or cardboard that could break down and compromise the quality of your potting mix.
• Coco liners and moss-lined pots are very popular hanging basket planters. They can be lined with landscape fabric before planting to prevent water and soil from running out of the porous material.
• Houseplants can be incorporated into container displays for a nice grouping during the summer months. Houseplants like Desert Rose, Gardenias, Chlorophytum Ribbon Plant and Ponytail Palm love to spend the summer outdoors. Remember to acclimate them to their new environment by exposing them to outdoor temperatures and sun little by little to avoid leaf scorch.
Quick steps to planting containers
1. Choose a container with adequate drainage.
2. Fill the container with potting mix, leaving about 2 inches in large pots and approximately ½ inch in small pots. Work any time-released granular fertilizer into the soil if desired.
3. Gently wet the top of the soil to allow it to settle.
4. Follow the thriller/filler/spiller concept described in the tips above. Add your thriller plants to the center or back of the container. Next, place the filler plants in front of or surrounding the thriller plant. Finally, add the spiller plants that will trail over the edge of the planter.
5. Water thoroughly. It may be necessary to add additional potting mix if the soil has settled too low in the pot. Repeat watering in any additional soil.
There are a few things to note for hanging basket containers
Watering is the biggest challenge when it comes to hanging basket care. Hanging baskets tend to dry out faster than other container plantings. Large hanging baskets are easier to maintain as a higher volume of soil will stay moist longer than a small one. A majority of hanging baskets on the market are made from plastic. Plastic containers are usually inexpensive and tend to hold moisture well. Although plastic may not be the most attractive material, a spiller plant cascading down the sides of the pot will cover the plastic and create a delightful display. Coco liner or moss-lined hanging baskets are quite attractive, but watering can be a problem. They are so porous that water runs through too fast without saturating the soil. Some come with a plastic lining which can be helpful for retaining moisture. Ones that do not include a plastic liner can be remedied quickly by adding some landscape fabric. Because landscape fabric is permeable, it allows water to flow through while keeping the soil in place. When choosing plants for your hanging basket, it is wise to choose drought and heat tolerant plants, especially for baskets in full sun. Regardless of sun exposure, always to choose plants well-suited to your environment. By choosing the right plants, you can spend more time enjoying their beauty and less time tending to them.
Additional tips to keep your containers looking nice over the growing season
• As your planter continues to fill in and grow, apply a water-soluble fertilizer once every week or two.
• Be careful to not over-water plants in plastic or glazed-finish pots. These types of pots hold moisture longer than traditional clay pots. During the heat of summer, over-watering is rarely a problem.
• If one of your plants starts to take over the container, feel free to trim it back to give the other plants the room they need. It’s also okay to trim plants back if they start to look poor. Sometimes this is just what they need to be rejuvenated.
Tips on Having the Best Container Plantings
Tips on Having the Best Container Plantings

Tips on Having the Best Container Plantings

Tips on Having the Best Container Plantings


Categories
Categories
Categories
Categories